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Dog, How’d You Get So Happy

Dog, How’d You Get So Happy

Who’s The Happy Puppy Dog?

For the most part, dogs tend to have a happy look to them. This applies to the stuffed animal dog as well.

I wanted to challenge myself a bit to attempt to have an object “express” or convey an emotion. Typically you will here photographers talking about high or low key images to convey emotion/mood. Others will talk about adding a high or low perspective to convey the same. These techniques were used along with the human brain to interpret body language.

You don’t have to be an expert in canine behavior to assign a human mood or emotion to a dog. A simple head-tilt can communicate comic, inquisitive, or disease.

Due to poor technique and lack of oversight as I was shooting, the “sad” images will need to be shot again. The “happy” images are alright with a few exceptions. BUT that is not the point of the post.

Dog in a square frame
Dog in a square frame

I made use of two flashes for this image. A Nikon in a small softbox and a Minolta off in the distance to cut the shadow in the background and bring in some extra light to the overall scene.

Dog with a silly posture
Dog with a silly posture

In case you want to know, his name is Dog. He has been with us for about 8yrs. The lighting is the same as described above. I made use of some dogs upside down posture when fooling around or resting.

Portrait of Dog
Portrait of Dog

It will be curious to see if the same sense of emotion/mood can be conveyed by an image of, say a pencil or apple? As mentioned, lighting and camera angle will play a major part in the photographer’s “message”. Lets not forget about some of the more subtle cues and contributors such as background and props even graphic/text overlay.

Posted on: September 14, 2017Erik

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